Wearable Futures round-up

Pooja Kanabar

Wearable Futures was hosted at Ravensbourne last week. It was held over two days, with over 50 speakers and 300 audience members in attendance. The event provided insight into the future of wearable technology.


The conference and workshops showcased multidisciplinary collaboration and the opportunity to explore new concepts and ideas. The projects presented throughout the two days varied between; devices worn on the body, such as Dominic Wilcox’s GPS shoes, to large, interactive spaces and locations, as seen in the Hello Lamp Post project, presented by Tom ArmitageThese projects emphasised just how much wearable technology has evolved from geek to chic.

A key theme was how technology has been used as a way to further facilitate human interaction and communication. Heidi Hinder’s Money No Object project explored the impact of digital technology on future human interaction. An interesting experiment of hers included using human handshakes and hugs to transfer money via electronic sensors. 

Google glasses were the must-have accessory with plenty of attendee’s sporting just how far the blend of fashion and technology has evolved.

Some other highlights of the event included:

Clothes that change colour according to climate by Lauren Bowker 

Lauren Bowker and her extravagant PHNX fashion pieces made from feathers impregnated with ink that responds to light, heat and friction so they ripple with changing tones as the wearer moves. 

Self-repairing trainers, 3D printed from biological cells by Shamees Aden

Shamees Aden's Protocells trainers are 3D-printed to the exact size of the user's foot from a material that fits like a second skin. It would react to pressure and movement that is created when running, puffing up to provide extra cushioning when required.  

Carrie Wooten - Head of Commercial Development said: “The inaugural Wearable Futures event successfully brought together industry representatives from across sectors to discuss and debate this emerging area. With over 300 people in attendance and 529k audience reached online, Ravensbourne is now leading the field in showcasing the developments in and around wearable technology”.